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(Leela beloved,The case of women cciiumcisron is an interesting example of cultural norms and liberal perspectives. There is nothing wrong with having an opinion and ultimately rejecting a specific cultural practice based on one's take. for example Bu)
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[[File:GOWBetrayal.png|thumb|God of War: Betrayal main menu.]]
 
[[File:GOWBetrayal.png|thumb|God of War: Betrayal main menu.]]
'''''God of War: Betrayal''''', also known as ''God of War Mobile'', is a 2-dimensional side-scrolling hack-and-slash video game based on the previous games in the [[God of War Series|God of War series]], released on mobile phones June 20th 2007 by Sony Pictures Entertainment. Chronologically, it takes place after [[God of War]], although it was mistakenly reported that it followed [[God of War II]]. Recently, [[God of War: Ghost of Sparta]] was announced for the PlayStation Portable, which equally takes place after [[God of War]].
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'''''God of War: Betrayal''''', also known as ''God of War Mobile'', is a 2-dimensional side-scrolling hack-and-slash video game based on the previous games in the [[God of War Series|''God of War'' series]], released on mobile phones June 20th 2007 by Sony Pictures Entertainment. Chronologically, it takes place after ''[[God of War]]''. ''[[God of War: Ghost of Sparta]]'' also takes place after ''God of War'', likely taking place after ''Betrayal''. However, it is hinted that ''Betrayal'' is actually non-canon to the ''God of War'' series.
   
Unlike the other games in the series, it is played on mobile phones. It is currently available on operators and portals world wide.<br />
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Unlike the other games in the series, it was never released on home or portable consoles. It is currently available on operators and portals worldwide. A demo for Microsoft Windows can be downloaded for free.
A PC demo can be downloaded for free.
 
   
 
==Story==
 
==Story==
 
{{spoiler}}
 
{{spoiler}}
Following the events of God of War: Ghost of Sparta, [[Kratos]] is leading his Spartan army against Greece. While fighting alongside his warriors, he is attacked by a number of beasts led by the giant, [[Argos]], who is sent by [[Hera]] to stop the war Kratos is waging. However, before Kratos is able to kill the beast, it is killed by an unknown [[Assassin|assassin]] as a clear effort to destroy the anti-hero's reputation with the Gods of [[Olympus]]. Kratos pursues him through [[Greece]] in order to discover the identity of the assassin's master, who is attempting to turn the gods against him. However, he is being slowed down by an attack of [[Hades]]' minions. Soon, the son of [[Hermes]], [[Ceryx]], is sent to deliver a message to Kratos from Zeus, who's becoming increasingly concerned with the amount of destruction left in Kratos' path. Ceryx confronts Kratos, but the God of War refuses to cease and engages the messenger in battle. Taking advantage of the situation, the assassin escapes. The game concludes as Kratos kills Ceryx and the [[Spartan]] soldiers celebrate, but observing the dead god's body, he realizes that Zeus would eventually take action for this act of defiance.
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Following the events of [[God of War]], [[Kratos]] is leading his [[Spartan]] army [[Unnamed Greek City|against]] [[Greece]]. While fighting alongside his warriors, he is attacked by a number of beasts led by the giant, [[Argos]], who is sent by [[Hera]] to stop the war Kratos is waging. However, before Kratos is able to kill the beast, it is killed by an unknown [[Assassin|assassin]] as a clear effort to destroy the anti-hero's reputation with the Gods of [[Olympus]]. Kratos pursues him through [[Greece]] in order to discover the identity of the assassin's master, who is attempting to turn the gods against him. However, he is being slowed down by an attack of [[Hades]]' minions. Soon, the son of [[Hermes]], [[Ceryx]], is sent to deliver a message to Kratos from [[Zeus]], who's becoming increasingly concerned with the amount of destruction left in Kratos' path. Ceryx confronts Kratos, but the God of War refuses to cease and engages the messenger in battle. Taking advantage of the situation, the assassin escapes. The game concludes as Kratos kills Ceryx and the Spartan soldiers celebrate, but observing the dead god's body, he realizes that Zeus would eventually take action for this act of defiance.
   
 
==Characters==
 
==Characters==
* [[Kratos]]: The new God of War who chose to aid his Spartan people in conquering all of Greece.
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* [[Kratos]]: The new God of War who chose to lead his Spartan people in conquering all of Greece.
 
* [[Spartan]]s: The great warriors whose army is led by the God of War himself.
 
* [[Spartan]]s: The great warriors whose army is led by the God of War himself.
* [[Argos]]: A gigantic beast with multiple eyes sent by the [[Gods]] to stop the Kratos and his Spartan Army. Pet of Hera
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* [[Argos]]: A gigantic beast with multiple eyes sent by the [[Gods]] to stop the Kratos and his Spartan army. Pet of Hera
 
* [[Assassin]]: Enigmatic enemy of Kratos who slew Argos for unknown reasons.
 
* [[Assassin]]: Enigmatic enemy of Kratos who slew Argos for unknown reasons.
 
* [[Ceryx]]: The Messenger of Olympus, and the one who was sent out to make Kratos stop his pursuit of the Assassin. He is the son of Hermes.
 
* [[Ceryx]]: The Messenger of Olympus, and the one who was sent out to make Kratos stop his pursuit of the Assassin. He is the son of Hermes.
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* [[Medusa's Gaze]]: Medusa's severed head, that can temporarily freeze enemies into stone.
 
* [[Medusa's Gaze]]: Medusa's severed head, that can temporarily freeze enemies into stone.
   
Leela beloved,The case of women cciiumcisron is an interesting example of cultural norms and liberal perspectives. There is nothing wrong with having an opinion and ultimately rejecting a specific cultural practice based on one's take. for example Bush's war to bring democracy to Iraq. In the place that we live in we it is inconceivable that someone might prefer a different kind of regime or that someone might have values that trump the perception of freedom that comes with what we conceive to be a democracy. however, it is a judgement that is better executed after we know about the core values and the priorities of the Iraqi people, of whatever culture we think that we should enforce our own worldview on. Female cciiumcisron is probably (along perhaps with female infanticide ) one of the most visceral propositions that encounter immediate disgust and rejection among the like of us (me included). But it is a custom that exists in many societies none of which a society that do not have the equivalent practice for men. Genetile modification in most of these societies is also reflecting a perception of body and pureness, a tradition that has its own history and values that goes well beyond the shallow, two-dimensional portrayals of the ritual in the West- a mutilation of the female to enhance male dominance and horrific control over women's legitimate sexual urges. Which brings us back to the question of how do we pass judgement on practices of other cultures? For myself, I'm not a cultural absolutist (meaning I don't think that one can not pass such judgements) I believe that one needs to learn enough about such practices from an emic perspective (meaning one should learn about the practice from an "insider" point-of-view) that reflects real learning rather than the common media or other outsider portrayals. Take for example female cciiumcisron. This is a practice common in many African countries, in some of the East Africa states it involves upward of 90% of the women. In the vast majority of the practices (which by the way vary considerably between different communities) the practice does not involve the removal of any organ (clit or lips) and in many of the societies it involves a single incision to the lips which heals quite fast and leaves no lasting effects. In many of the societies the women are responsible for the execution of the practice in a form of a rite of passage to adulthood , and this practice is more symbolic than surgical. There are many incidents of horrifying examples of this practice which make my skin crawl and the stomach turn. There are many other indications of pride in the practice as many believe it reflects some of the core values that they hold dearly. A Somalian women who lived in the US since childhood, decided to go back to Somalia and have this practice done following her graduation from Harvard. For her it meant very different thing than for many of the girls who are forced to go through that by force or by social pressure (in some societies one cannot marry unless she had that done). Before we condone (or reject for that matter) this practice (and other) we should learn about the actual details- How does it effect most women who experience that, socially, psychologically, and physically. One would actually find hardly any systematic scientific accounts for that phenomenon. We should learn how this practice is carried out and by whom. Sensational portrayals and selective accounts can hardly be considered a legitimate basis for passing judgement on an entrenched cultural practice. At the end we can still have an opinion on that (which would likely be more nuanced and informed) and hold on to our own core values in a way that suggest the universalism of them- there are no good cultural specific basis to perform act X regardless of the local cultural values. But through this process we might just learn about the other from eye level and not from a perspective filled with underlying tones of the superiority that so many of us Westerns still experience implicitly when we look at "primitive" cultural practices which we know so little about. Just a thought
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===Items===
Leela beloved,The case of women cciiumcisron is an interesting example of cultural norms and liberal perspectives. There is nothing wrong with having an opinion and ultimately rejecting a specific cultural practice based on one's take. for example Bush's war to bring democracy to Iraq. In the place that we live in we it is inconceivable that someone might prefer a different kind of regime or that someone might have values that trump the perception of freedom that comes with what we conceive to be a democracy. however, it is a judgement that is better executed after we know about the core values and the priorities of the Iraqi people, of whatever culture we think that we should enforce our own worldview on. Female cciiumcisron is probably (along perhaps with female infanticide ) one of the most visceral propositions that encounter immediate disgust and rejection among the like of us (me included). But it is a custom that exists in many societies none of which a society that do not have the equivalent practice for men. Genetile modification in most of these societies is also reflecting a perception of body and pureness, a tradition that has its own history and values that goes well beyond the shallow, two-dimensional portrayals of the ritual in the West- a mutilation of the female to enhance male dominance and horrific control over women's legitimate sexual urges. Which brings us back to the question of how do we pass judgement on practices of other cultures? For myself, I'm not a cultural absolutist (meaning I don't think that one can not pass such judgements) I believe that one needs to learn enough about such practices from an emic perspective (meaning one should learn about the practice from an "insider" point-of-view) that reflects real learning rather than the common media or other outsider portrayals. Take for example female cciiumcisron. This is a practice common in many African countries, in some of the East Africa states it involves upward of 90% of the women. In the vast majority of the practices (which by the way vary considerably between different communities) the practice does not involve the removal of any organ (clit or lips) and in many of the societies it involves a single incision to the lips which heals quite fast and leaves no lasting effects. In many of the societies the women are responsible for the execution of the practice in a form of a rite of passage to adulthood , and this practice is more symbolic than surgical. There are many incidents of horrifying examples of this practice which make my skin crawl and the stomach turn. There are many other indications of pride in the practice as many believe it reflects some of the core values that they hold dearly. A Somalian women who lived in the US since childhood, decided to go back to Somalia and have this practice done following her graduation from Harvard. For her it meant very different thing than for many of the girls who are forced to go through that by force or by social pressure (in some societies one cannot marry unless she had that done). Before we condone (or reject for that matter) this practice (and other) we should learn about the actual details- How does it effect most women who experience that, socially, psychologically, and physically. One would actually find hardly any systematic scientific accounts for that phenomenon. We should learn how this practice is carried out and by whom. Sensational portrayals and selective accounts can hardly be considered a legitimate basis for passing judgement on an entrenched cultural practice. At the end we can still have an opinion on that (which would likely be more nuanced and informed) and hold on to our own core values in a way that suggest the universalism of them- there are no good cultural specific basis to perform act X regardless of the local cultural values. But through this process we might just learn about the other from eye level and not from a perspective filled with underlying tones of the superiority that so many of us Westerns still experience implicitly when we look at "primitive" cultural practices which we know so little about. Just a thought
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* [[Gorgon Eyes]]: Collect to increase Health.
  +
* [[Phoenix Feathers]]: Collect to increase Magic.
   
 
==Trivia==
 
==Trivia==
 
*Speculations arose regarding as to the [[Assassin|Assassin's]] true identity. Unconfirmed sources claim it is in fact Hermes, in disguise, which suggests the whole plot against Kratos was orchestrated by Hades, who joined forces with Hermes to turn the rest of the gods against Kratos.
 
*Speculations arose regarding as to the [[Assassin|Assassin's]] true identity. Unconfirmed sources claim it is in fact Hermes, in disguise, which suggests the whole plot against Kratos was orchestrated by Hades, who joined forces with Hermes to turn the rest of the gods against Kratos.
*This is the first and only God of War game that was not released on a Sony PlayStation platform, and does not have bonus costumes or sex-mini games.
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*This is the first and only God of War game that was not released on a Sony PlayStation platform, and does not have bonus costumes.
   
 
==Gallery==
 
==Gallery==
<gallery type="slideshow" position="center" widths="200">
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<gallery type="slideshow" position="center" widths="301">
 
Gds.jpg
 
Gds.jpg
 
Go.jpg
 
Go.jpg
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ImagesCAYDYCM1.jpg
 
ImagesCAYDYCM1.jpg
 
goofwam.jpg|The final fight of the game
 
goofwam.jpg|The final fight of the game
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betrayal.jpeg|The Betrayal (god of war)|linktext=The Great lord Kratos
 
</gallery>
 
</gallery>
   
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*[http://www.godofwarforums.com The Official God of War Fan Community]
 
*[http://www.godofwarforums.com The Official God of War Fan Community]
[[Category:God of War:Betrayal]]
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==Site Navigation==
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{{Basic Info}}
  +
[[Category:God of War: Betrayal]]
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[[Category:Noncanon]]
 
[[Category:God of War Series]]
 
[[Category:God of War Series]]
 
[[Category:Games]]
 
[[Category:Games]]

Latest revision as of 19:39, October 19, 2018

Kratos, slayer of Gods!

Ceryx.

GOWBetrayal

God of War: Betrayal main menu.

God of War: Betrayal, also known as God of War Mobile, is a 2-dimensional side-scrolling hack-and-slash video game based on the previous games in the God of War series, released on mobile phones June 20th 2007 by Sony Pictures Entertainment. Chronologically, it takes place after God of WarGod of War: Ghost of Sparta also takes place after God of War, likely taking place after Betrayal. However, it is hinted that Betrayal is actually non-canon to the God of War series.

Unlike the other games in the series, it was never released on home or portable consoles. It is currently available on operators and portals worldwide. A demo for Microsoft Windows can be downloaded for free.

StoryEdit



Following the events of God of War, Kratos is leading his Spartan army against Greece. While fighting alongside his warriors, he is attacked by a number of beasts led by the giant, Argos, who is sent by Hera to stop the war Kratos is waging. However, before Kratos is able to kill the beast, it is killed by an unknown assassin as a clear effort to destroy the anti-hero's reputation with the Gods of Olympus. Kratos pursues him through Greece in order to discover the identity of the assassin's master, who is attempting to turn the gods against him. However, he is being slowed down by an attack of Hades' minions. Soon, the son of Hermes, Ceryx, is sent to deliver a message to Kratos from Zeus, who's becoming increasingly concerned with the amount of destruction left in Kratos' path. Ceryx confronts Kratos, but the God of War refuses to cease and engages the messenger in battle. Taking advantage of the situation, the assassin escapes. The game concludes as Kratos kills Ceryx and the Spartan soldiers celebrate, but observing the dead god's body, he realizes that Zeus would eventually take action for this act of defiance.

CharactersEdit

  • Kratos: The new God of War who chose to lead his Spartan people in conquering all of Greece.
  • Spartans: The great warriors whose army is led by the God of War himself.
  • Argos: A gigantic beast with multiple eyes sent by the Gods to stop the Kratos and his Spartan army. Pet of Hera
  • Assassin: Enigmatic enemy of Kratos who slew Argos for unknown reasons.
  • Ceryx: The Messenger of Olympus, and the one who was sent out to make Kratos stop his pursuit of the Assassin. He is the son of Hermes.

EnemiesEdit

Common EnemiesEdit

  • Greek Soldier: Mere humans protecting the Greek cities from the ravaging God of War.
  • Dead Riders: These undead horsemen are sent by Hades to collect souls of those who are dead.
  • Minotaurs: Mighty critters that appear in the city as a sign from the Gods.
  • Cerberi: These three headed beasts are the minions of Hades that try to stop Kratos.
  • Undead Legionnaires: Hades' undead army come to Greece in order to stop Kratos from reaching the Assassin.

BossesEdit

  • Argos: The multi-eyed monster and Hera's favorite pet. This beast appears to stop Kratos' war campaign. Kratos fights the beast during his journey through a besieged city, usually forcing it to retreat. Eventually, Kratos crushes Argos into a sewer, where it is killed by the blades of the unknown Assassin.
  • Ceryx: The messenger of the Gods who appears before Kratos and stops him from pursuing the Assassin. Kratos, infuriated by Ceryx's actions, attacks the God. After receiving enough damage, Ceryx falls dead, but before vanishing forever, he proclaims Kratos "the Slayer of Gods".

InventoryEdit

The entire inventory is based on weapons and items collected in the first God of War game.

WeaponsEdit

MagicEdit

  • Army of Hades: A powerful spell that summons undead souls.
  • Medusa's Gaze: Medusa's severed head, that can temporarily freeze enemies into stone.

ItemsEdit

TriviaEdit

  • Speculations arose regarding as to the Assassin's true identity. Unconfirmed sources claim it is in fact Hermes, in disguise, which suggests the whole plot against Kratos was orchestrated by Hades, who joined forces with Hermes to turn the rest of the gods against Kratos.
  • This is the first and only God of War game that was not released on a Sony PlayStation platform, and does not have bonus costumes.

GalleryEdit

  • The final fight of the game
  • The Betrayal (god of war)

External LinksEdit

Site NavigationEdit

God of War Main Series
Main Games: God of War: Ascension | God of War: Chains of Olympus | God of War (2005) | God of War: Ghost of Sparta | God of War II | God of War III | God of War: A Call from the Wilds | God of War (2018)
Others: God of War (Novel) | God of War 2 Novel | God of War (Comics)
Remakes and Ports
Collections: God of War: Collection | God of War: Origins Collection | God of War: Saga
Non-Canon
Games: God of War: Betrayal | Bit of War
Films: God of War (Film)
Plot Elements
Terms: God of War (Title) | Gods | Immortal | Mortal | Titans | Pandora's Box | Hope | Plagues | Colors | Greece
Events: Siege of Attica | Siege of Athens | Siege of Rhodes | Titanomachy | Second Titanomachy | The Marked Warrior
Gameplay Elements and Bonuses
Gameplay Chest | Orb Chests | Multiplayer | Kratos' Equipment | Godly Possessions | Urns of Power | Sex Mini-Game | Quick Time Events | Rage Ability | Save Altar | Combos | Bonus Play
Bonuses: Bonus Costumes | Easter Egg | Secret Message | A Secret Revealed | Birth of the Beast | The Fate of the Titan
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.